Tag Archives: Rules

European growth, regulatory changes drive asset moves

The recovery of the European economy — combined with moves by regulators to free up potential sources of return — is leading to a paradigm shift in asset allocation. But conflicting regulatory regimes could curtail some of the opportunity, sources said.

European pension funds’ investing patterns are beginning to change, thanks to a lifting of asset allocation restrictions across the Continent that is coinciding with the long-awaited recovery in the European economy and a changing global interest rate environment.

The global financial crisis left asset owners in Europe with no appetite for more volatile asset classes.

And European pension funds historically were heavily invested in fixed-income instruments.

Continue Reading “European growth, regulatory changes drive asset moves” at Pensions & Investments

Moody’s: Solvency II regulatory disclosures unlikely to affect European insurers’ credit quality

Creditworthiness of European rated insurers is unlikely to be affected when they will have to reveal, for the first time starting in May 2017, the extent to which their Solvency II ratios are enhanced by various measures, including transitionals and long-term guarantee measures, says Moody’s Investors Service in a report published today. The disclosures are part of insurers’ compliance reporting under the new capital regime.

Moody’s report, “Insurers — Europe: New Solvency II disclosure to provide insight, but unlikely to change our credit view,” is available on www.moodys.com. Moody’s subscribers can access this report via the link provided at the end of this press release. The rating agency’s report is an update to the markets and does not constitute a rating action.

Continued Reading “Moody’s: Solvency II regulatory disclosures unlikely to affect European insurers’ credit quality” at EconoTimes

Moody’s assigns Ba2(hyb) rating to RSA’s SEK2.5 billion/DKK650 million perpetual contingent convertible notes

London, 24 March 2017 — Moody’s Investors Service has today assigned a Ba2(hyb) rating to the SEK2.5 billion/DKK650 million perpetual restricted Tier 1 contingent convertible notes (“notes”) to be issued by RSA Insurance Group plc (“RSA” or “Group”; backed subordinated rating Baa1(hyb), stable outlook).

Moody’s approach to rating “high trigger” contingent capital securities is described in its Global insurance rating methodologies (Global Property and Casualty Insurers: https://www.moodys.com/researchdocumentcontentpage.aspx?docid=PBC_190302).

The notes rank junior to RSA’s senior creditors (including Tier 2 capital) and existing preference shares, but they rank senior to common shares. Coupons may be cancelled on a non-cumulative basis at the issuer’s option and on a mandatory basis if the Group’s solvency capital requirement is breached.

Continue Reading “Moody’s assigns Ba2(hyb) rating to RSA’s SEK2.5 billion/DKK650 million perpetual contingent convertible notes” at Moody’s

NAIC asks Treasury secretary to review EU-US covered agreement

The National Association of Insurance Commissioners has asked the new Treasury secretary to clarify provisions of the covered agreement reached between the United States and the European Union in response to the bloc’s Solvency II directive. 

The covered agreement deal negotiated by the U.S. Department of the Treasury under the Obama administration and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, announced on Jan. 13, aims to address the fact that the European Commission has not deemed the United States an equivalent jurisdiction, per the EU’s Solvency II directive outlining a risk-based capital regime for insurers and reinsurers in Europe.

Continue Reading “NAIC asks Treasury secretary to review EU-US covered agreement” at Business Insurance News

Mutual LV= weighs merger or disposals as capital rules bite

One of Britain’s largest financial services mutuals has been involved in a secret hunt for a merger partner as a combination of tougher capital requirements and low interest rates hamper its profitability.

dddvtureSky News has learnt that LV=, which has nearly 6m UK customers across insurance, pensions and income protection products, has held aborted talks in recent months with Royal London, its fellow mutual, about a possible tie-up.

Those talks are said to have broken down amid a disagreement over the structure of a deal.

Continue Reading “Mutual LV= weighs merger or disposals as capital rules bite” at Sky News

Pensions: IORP II and the elephant in the room

After almost two years of negotiation, the revised European Union Directive on the Activities and Supervision of Institutions for Occupational Retirement Provision (IORP II) comes into effect today.newPic_4681_jpg_3388340b

Member States will now have two years to incorporate it into national law.

But what is IORP II? How will it impact on occupational pension provision in the UK? And what about the elephant in room – Brexit?

Background

IORP I came into effect in 2003, and lays down rules for activities carried out by IORPs (which, in the UK, are broadly employer-funded occupational pension schemes).

Continue Reading “Pensions: IORP II and the elephant in the room” at Lexology

Law firms highlight potential issues with UK’s draft ILS regulations

As the UK government continues to develop and advance its ambition of turning London into a global hub for insurance-linked securities (ILS) business, international law firms have highlighted some uncertainties and potential shortcomings of the new guidelines.index

The establishment of an ILS hub in the United Kingdom has the potential to expand the reach and influence of the ILS marketplace, while increasing the relevance and position of London as a global hub for insurance and reinsurance business.

Fist discussed in March 2015, the UK Treasury has now published its draft proposals for the framework, with the UK’s financial regulators, the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) and the…

Continue Reading “Law firms highlight potential issues with UK’s draft ILS regulations” at Artemis

What Brexit and Trump mean for compliance

Regulatory requirements across all industries are constantly evolving. Rules are also becoming increasingly intricate because of the overlap involving multiple nations and jurisdictional specifics.

Both the Brexit vote and Trump’s victory have added further uncertainty about the future, leaving CIOs and IT managers in a minefield of business risks and with the responsibility to ensure their companies comply with changing legislation.

The UK voted to leave the European Union on 23 June, but will remain a member but will remain a member until the conclusion of the withdrawal – at least 2019.

Continue Reading “What Brexit and Trump mean for compliance” at Information Age

Time to scale back the role of insurance regulators?

Is it possible for regulators to become too heavily involved in the insurance business? One giant of the UK insurance sector seems to think so. Legal & General has accused a regulator of becoming increasingly interventionist in their control of the industry law-11believing that their role should be cut back.

Specifically, it highlighted the position of the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) in relation to Solvency II rules stating that it is “effectively overruling the judgment of the board” in relation to setting capital requirements; and that it has started to take an increasingly “directive” approach in regards to transaction approval.

“Boards do not feel empowered to make commercial decisions without reference to the regulator,” it said in a submission to the Treasury Select Committee.

Continue Reading “Time to scale back the role of insurance regulators?” at Insurance Business

Brexit vote prompts fears over UK insurers’ capital strength

LONDON (Reuters) – Market falls triggered by Britain’s vote to leave the European Union will hit British insurers’ capital, raising concerns over their ability escalating-concerns-during_0to pay dividends or hand cash back to investors.

New European capital Solvency II rules introduced in January require insurers to account for investment risk, and solvency models to be regularly updated.

Life insurers in particular invest in bond markets to match their long-term pension liabilities, and have increasingly moved into corporate bond markets which offer higher returns.

But confidence in UK corporate bonds is dipping and equity markets, in which insurers also invest, are weaker too.

Continue Reading “Brexit vote prompts fears over UK insurers’ capital strength” at Reuters